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Facets

Language Arts & Based on Books

Celebrate the love of reading and writing with this rich array of short films—many of them based on folktales, books, and poems! These dynamic films inspired by the written and spoken word will excite your students to discover the transformative power of literature and language for all grade levels.

All programs include theatrical screening and media education.

How to book?
Book a field trip or in-school session today.

fldtrips@facets.org
Phone: 773.281.9075 ext. 3040

How much does it cost?
Field trips: Tickets are $6 per kid for groups of 25 or more and $7 for groups under 25. Chaperones attend free of charge based on an approximate 10:1 ratio of students to chaperones—there is a $10 fee for each additional chaperone. Refreshment packages are available.

In-School sessions: Session cost is determined by class size. We charge $8 per kid for groups of 50 or more, but there is a minimum fee of $400 for groups of 50 or less. There is an additional $100 fee for each additional 20 miles from Chicago.


Film still from Awesome Adaptations program

Awesome Adaptations

Grades PreK–1

Early readers will be excited to compare and contrast the filmed versions of their favorite reads. Whether favorite illustrations come to life or meeting new friends in familiar circumstances, there are fresh and friendly experiences ahead in Awesome Adaptations!

Whether it's Walt Whitman's frosty poem, Common Core Standard, or Kitten's First Full Moon&151;there are many treasures to rediscover on the big screen. In one film, a determined princess finally understands the true meaning of self-expression when a member of her court speaks up. In another film, a Nutbrown Hare and friends gather examples of the color blue, only to find the biggest blue is above them the whole time.

Themes: Friendship; Teamwork; Managing expectations; Syllable vowel sounds; Genre (poem, oral history, bedtime story, song); Order and sequence; Shapes; Relation between illustration and text.

Films: Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening, Tales for Tiny Tots: "Everyone Gets to Come Along", Art, The Sun of Bagnolet Street, Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site, The Princess' Painting, Kitten's First Full Moon, Guess How Much I Love You: "Blue Wonder", and A House for Hermit Crab.

70 mins with media education. Films screened in English, French, German, and Swedish with English subtitles.

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Film still from Once Upon a Time program

Once Upon a Time

Grades 2–4

This series proves that folk and fairy tales can teach us about different traditions and cultures.

In an animated fabric film, two sisters pair up to take on a witch with bad intentions. In a beautiful, painterly film from Iran, the village celebrates the happiness of a young couple-to-be. In the award-winning Room on the Broom, friends come together to help their witch in distress. "Happily ever after" can take many forms, so set aside some Once Upon a Time for your students to visit these new and exciting places!

Themes: Family relations and celebrations in diverse cultures; friendship, teamwork, overcoming differences; perspectives on gender in other cultures.

Films: The Owl and the Pussycat, Delirious Tales: "The Chicken, the Elephant and the Snake", Carrot Jam, Hajar's Wedding, Two Princesses, Polish Fairy Tales: "The Golden Apple Tree", and Room on the Broom.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English, French, Hungarian, Iranian, Polish, and Russian with English subtitles.

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Film still from Tales with Tails program

Tales with Tails

Grades 3–5

Folktales, poems, and stories from diverse cultures expose students to different points of view in this film series.

In one film, an oral lesson from the Native American narrator reveals the wisdom of the wolf, as there is much to learn from our animal brothers and sisters. The next film is a puppet animation version of William Blake's famous poem, in a powerful, inventive reimagining from Brazil. Finally, two favorite book adaptations, including the CICFF 2010 Best of Fest winner, The Gruffalo and the immensely popular 2013 Festival favorite, I Want My Hat Back.

Themes: Narration, point of view, character, setting; genre: stories, myths, folktales, poems from different cultures. Animals. Deduction, sequence. Adventure.

Films: The Happy Duckling, Wolf Dog Tales, Tyger, I Want My Hat Back, La Fontaine Turns Film-makers: The Crow and the Fox, and The Gruffalo.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English, Portuguese, Hungarian, and French with English subtitles.

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Film still from Words Matter program

Words Matter

Grades 3–5

Characters in this series recognize the power of words and how to use them in a constructive manner.

Whether collecting them, as Max does in the first film; or finding and "owning" their meaning, as Alex tries to grasp, in Encyclopedia. The hero in the Oscar-winning animated short film, Mr. Lessmore, finds the true meaning of words: to bring connection and life from the page to the reader. In another film, "pages" in Dad's imagination have come to life, and it's up to "The Young Detectives" to help find the lost writer in his tangled words. Compare and contrast—what do these films and film versions of poems and stories have to tell us about where words come from, feelings and motivations?

Themes: Word structure, definition. Point of view, character. Paying it forward. Love of words, character feelings and connections, internal life of books.

Films: The Owl and the Pussycat, The Young Detectives: "World of Imagination", Wallace's Lists, Encyclopedia, and The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English, Portuguese, and Norwegian with English subtitles.

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Film still from Point of View program

Point of View

Grades 5–8

Discover an alternate world of films featuring outsiders' points of view and dreamers with new outlooks.

In one film, the hero goes beyond what is expected of him and a sweet surprise is in store. In another film, narrated by Alan Rickman, Rupert discovers he can't cut himself off from everyone, just yet. In the Oscar-winning films, The Lost Thing and Morris Lessmore, the heroes make a wordless connection to creatures other than themselves, with big results.

Themes: Point of view, narration, genre (poems, fantasy, science fiction, adventure, futuristic/dystopia, folktale). Style (rhymed verse). Feelings, paying it forward.

Films: Emmeline, The Boy with Chocolate Fingers, Junk, The Boy in the Bubble, The Lost Thing, and The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English.

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Film still from The Breadwinner

The Breadwinner

M

Grades 6+

From executive producer Angelina Jolie and the creators of the Academy Award®-nominated The Secret of Kells and Song of the Sea, comes the highly-anticipated new feature based on Deborah Ellis' bestselling novel.

Parvana is an 11-year-old girl growing up under the Taliban in Afghanistan in 2001. When her father is wrongfully arrested, Parvana cuts off her hair and dresses like a boy in order to support her family. Working alongside her friend Shauzia, Parvana discovers a new world of freedom—and danger. With undaunted courage, Parvana draws strength from the fantastical stories she invents, as she embarks on a quest to find her father and reunite her family.

Equal parts thrilling and enchanting, The Breadwinner is an inspiring and luminously animated tale about the power of stories to sustain hope and carry us through dark times

Themes: Compare and contrast different genres, formats, styles of texts with filmed versions of poems and settings; Character and relationships; Point of view; Observation and description; Communication through the written and spoken word.

Directed by Nora Twomey. 109 mins with media education. Presented in English.

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Film still from Rhythm Nation program

Rhythm Nation

M

Grades 6–8

The animated and live-action films in this collection are inspired by rhyme, verse or the spoken word, certain to spark thought-provoking discussion.

A series of shorts inspired by French poets explore the lyrical power of words. In one film, a first generation immigrant girl's rhyming skills triumph over bullies. In seeking inspiration in her rhymes, she learns how to spin her own tale and find self-confidence. Listen, observe, compare and contrast!

Themes: Compare and contrast different genres, formats, styles of texts with filmed versions of poems and settings; Character and relationships; Point of view; Observation and description; Communication through the written and spoken word.

Films: Rhymes and Rubbish, Emmeline, A Vegetated Director, So Many Forests, The Sun of Bagnolet Street, Time Off, The School of Fine Arts, The Story of Percival Pilts, The Boy with Chocolate Fingers, Migrations, and Munya in Me.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English, Estonian, Finnish, French, and German with English subtitles.

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Film still from It's the Write Time program

It's the Write Time

M

Grades 6–9

Witness the power of the written and spoken word as it transforms lives in these films. Whether these films are about letters, lyrics, journals, poems, texts—celebrate the magic of imagination and communication!

In one film, a pair of feathered pen pals meets when the seasons change and look to extend their exchange. In another film, Munya is stuck between restrictions at home and relentless teasing from neighborhood tough guys. When she finds her own expression in writing a rap song, she surprises everyone with the power of her rhymes.

Themes: Compare and contrast different genres, formats, styles of texts with filmed versions of poems, journals, letters; Character and relationships; Point of view; Observation and description; Communication through the written and spoken word; Epistolary romance.

Films: Peter Pix—The Love Letter, The Human Voice, Emmeline, Air-Mail, Coast Warning, Bottle, The Squirrel and the Swallow, The Blizzard, and Munya in Me.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English, German, Danish, and Russian with English subtitles.

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Film still from Free Verse program

Free Verse

Grades 8–10

Inspired by poetry, rhymes, and fantasy tales, the films in this collection are certain to spark thought-provoking discussion.

Then, a pair of spine-tingling short films leaps off the page, in classic short stories by H. G Lovecraft and Edgar Allen Poe. In the last film, an immigrant girl's rhyming skills triumph over neighborhood bullies. In seeking inspiration in her rhymes, she learns how to spin her own tale and find self-confidence.

Themes: Analyze the extent to which a filmed adaptation stays faithful; Point of view; Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different media to present a particular topic or idea; Analyze how particular incidents in a story propel the action or reveal character aspects.

Films: I Have Dreamed of You So Much, Reclining, Birds of Sorrow, So Many Forests, Pickman's Model, The Cask of Amontillado, Migrations, Humanexus, and Munya in Me.

90 mins with media education. Screened in English, French, Spanish, and German with English subtitles.

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  • John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
  • Artworks: National Endowment for the Arts
  • Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences
  • Comer Family Foundation
  • Bloomberg Philanthropies
  • Alphawood Foundation
  • Polk Bros. Foundation